Responsibility 

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I have always supported expanded medicaid, a single payer system as a basic coverage, so people are not bankrupted by medical bills for a loved one. Option to purchase additional elite insurance has been instituted in some single payer systems such as Australia, with mixed but mostly good results. However, my belief in basic health-care-for-all stems from a practical, money-saving, life improving standpoint…and is not so much about bleeding heart liberalism…With shared responsibility for health care coverage, must come the responsibility for one’s own health. Sometimes healthy choices are mandated by the system and this tends to raise further questions about who is making these rules and are they based in sound research? Just look at the recent DGA, Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Infiltrated by big food business interests, and ignoring current research, the starchy food pyramid was upheld and reinstituted again in the guidelines, even amidst tripled diabetes and doubled heart disease figures over the last 30 years since the DGA’s first inception. Understand this, the diseases the DGA targeted for reduction and elimination have actually doubled and tripled… 
Spending on prevention, through education in understanding the human body and how it works, nutritional counseling, quitting smoking, awareness and avoidance of the pitfalls of the SAD (standard American diet), stress reduction, reduced work week, compensation for parents who choose to stay home and care for an elder or children, awareness of lifestyle choices, etc. would save our country billions of dollars. The next most costly large scale medical catastrophes in this country are going to be Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, and metabolic syndrome in baby boomers. Metabolic syndrome is largely preventable and reversible and Type II primarily only persists as a result of unhealthy lifestyle choices. It is argued that, without raised awareness in nutrition, exercise, stress reduction, sleep, and healthy lifestyles, a single payer system would be too costly. Many health conscious or just plain lucky people, would resent paying for someone else’s bad choices or unlucky genetics. I think this is at the root of the opposition to single payer systems in the US, but folks just won’t admit it. If one person is healthy and not needing to take advantage of the benefits of the system, they are reluctant to want to have their tax dollars go to support others who smoke and eat junk food, live in cities and breathe bad air, or have otherwise unhealthy conditions that they choose to tolerate. Another area that will need to come to the table, so to speak, is food manufacturers. Since Kellogg, in the early 20th century, breakfast has been focused on a starchy sugary inflammation-causing mess. Responsibility in food manufacturing and propaganda from junk food manufacturers and sugar industry proponents needs to be checked, and education in nutrition and physiology has to be a major subject in elementary, middle and high school. Another faction in the debate are corporations that adhere to old models of productivity. While some new generation companies, offer healthy lifestyle rewards, flexible schedules, work from home scenarios, and recognize the benefit of honoring the family support system as important to their bottom line…others do not.

The truth is many socialist systems are at work in America. And if managed properly, they work just fine without placing undue burden on any one group of people.

The military. We should all pay in and enjoy a societal benefit from this institution whether or not we personally use it.

Public schools. We should all pay in and enjoy a societal benefit from this institution whether or not we personally use it.

Social Security. We should all pay in and enjoy a societal benefit from this institution whether or not we personally use it.

FEMA. We should all pay in and enjoy a societal benefit from this institution whether or not we personally use it.

Just to name a few.

Single payer health coverage. We should all pay in and enjoy a societal benefit from this institution whether or not we personally use it.

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